Frequently asked questions

Hosting the G7 Summit in Cornwall will inevitably have an impact upon residents, visitors and businesses in the region. With this in mind, we have pulled together some of the more commonly asked questions you might have.


Community impact

This is a major event with unique security considerations and will bring a level of inevitable disruption to the local communities, particularly around the four official locations of Carbis Bay, St Ives, Falmouth and Newquay. We are working with Government to minimise the impact on residents, businesses and visitors, and access to local services. The Government, alongside Cornwall Council and Devon & Cornwall Police, will be speaking to businesses, residents and homeowners directly impacted by the Summit.

Robust policing and security plans are in place to ensure a safe working environment for staff in and around all key locations. Each venue has been assigned a police commander and we are in regular contact with the owners.

The public should expect disruption to the road network, particularly into Carbis Bay and St Ives, during the event weekend.

We can now confirm that we expect changes to the train service on the St Ives branch line during the period of the event and we are working with partners who are identifying alternative rail replacement services. Any queries relating to train services should be directed to GWR.

Further details about any road closures or expected delays will be released in due course.

A small number of local amenities will be closed to the public during the Summit for security purposes.  Although it is not yet confirmed, it is likely that we can expect some restrictions to Carbis Bay beach in the lead up to and during the event.

As part of our security planning, we are working with the Local Authority and Harbour Master to apply to extend the current St Ives harbour limits.  This application is subject to a set process which is underway.  We are not seeking to disrupt either fishing fleet but there may be some navigational restrictions in place and we are engaging with local businesses to minimise disruption. Any such restrictions will be communicated via a local notice to mariners in due course.

As part of our security planning, we are working with the Local Authority and Harbour Master to apply to extend the current St Ives harbour limits.  This application is subject to a set process which is underway.  We are not seeking to disrupt either fishing fleet but there may be some navigational restrictions in place and we are engaging with local businesses to minimise disruption. Any such restrictions will be communicated via a local notice to mariners in due course.

We can’t discuss any specific measures, but the Government is working closely with local councils (with advice from police) to talk to residents whose properties may potentially be affected due to their proximity to the venues.

The three venues of Carbis Bay Hotel, Tregenna Castle and Falmouth Maritime Museum identified as hosting the G7 Summit will be closed to members of the public.

Additional security measures such as fencing will be erected in the run up to the event; particularly around the main venues.

Local residents should also expect changes to the road network and rail services; particularly into Carbis Bay and St Ives, during the event weekend.  Further details about road closures and changes to train services will be released shortly.

We are working closely with the Government and Cornwall Council/local councils to minimise any disruption to business operations caused by the Summit.

Falmouth and St Ives town centres will largely remain open during the Summit.  The areas around Tregenna Castle in St Ives and the Maritime Museum in Falmouth will however be restricted.

Falmouth and St Ives town centres will largely remain open during the Summit. The areas around Tregenna Castle in St Ives and the Maritime Museum in Falmouth will however be restricted.

Security planning is ongoing and specific details such as the location of cordons/road closures will be shared with residents and businesses in due course. Residents in the area of Tregenna Castle and Carbis Bay can expect disruption during the course of the event weekend.

We are keen to keep roads as open as possible and where routes are required to be closed, a traffic management plan that includes diversionary routes will be put in place.

The area around Falmouth Maritime Museum will be restricted during the Summit. Security planning is ongoing and specific detail will be shared with residents and businesses in due course. 

We are unable to discuss any specific details at present, but police and Government are working closely with local councils to talk to residents and businesses whose properties may potentially be affected due to their proximity to the venues.

The South West Coastal Path that runs through the Carbis Bay Hotel grounds will be subject to closure.  We are working with partners to minimise the impact of any restrictions.

Fencing will be erected in the run up to the Summit; particularly around the four official venues: Carbis Bay Hotel, Tregenna Castle, Falmouth Maritime Museum and Cornwall Airport Newquay. There will be a significant increase in security and reduction in access around these sites. Further detail will be shared with residents and businesses in mid-May.

Security planning is ongoing and specific detail such as the location of cordons/road closures will be shared with residents and businesses in due course.  Residents in the area of Tregenna Castle and Carbis Bay can expect disruption during the course of the event weekend.

The three venues of Carbis Bay Hotel, Tregenna Castle and Falmouth Maritime Museum identified as hosting the G7 Summit will be closed to members of the public. We are currently working with partners to consider and understand any impact to Cornwall Airport, Newquay.

Anyone planning to visit Cornwall on holiday during this time will experience a level of inevitable disruption; particularly around the four official venues: Carbis Bay Hotel, Tregenna Castle, Falmouth Maritime Museum and Cornwall Airport Newquay.

Further information relating to the impact of the G7 Summit can be found on our Impact page.

Devon & Cornwall Police, the Government and Cornwall Council will undertake significant engagement and communication with residents, businesses and all key community leaders over the coming weeks.

We want to hear local views and would encourage people to talk with their local neighbourhood officers to raise any concerns and questions.

We’d encourage you to join our community messaging system – Devon and Cornwall Alert, as well as regular contact from the local neighbourhood teams. We’re also holding public Q&A sessions LIVE on Facebook every other Wednesday from 6pm.

We have a dedicated neighbourhood officer in St Ives for all matters regarding the G7 Summit. PC Warren Trestrail will be out and about in the community and is available to answer your questions or relay your concerns to the G7 planning team.

Alternatively you can contact the neighbourhood team by emailing G7Engagement@devonandcornwall.pnn.police.uk

Local schools will make their own decisions on whether they feel they need to close and deliver education remotely based on the impact of the event in their local area.

We are aware of some inaccurate information in relation to the full closure of St Ives Road for the duration of the G7 event. There is an anticipated level of disruption expected, but at this time road closure plans are not confirmed and work is ongoing to finalise these to minimise the impact on local businesses and residents. We expect to be able to communicate these plans in early May.

 

 

A temporary mast is due to be built in Porthrepta Car Park, St Ives, to provide crucial support needed for emergency service radio cover during the G7 Leaders’ Summit and is not a 5G mast.

The existing masts in the area do not have sufficient capacity to support the additional use which will be required for the thousands of officers and emergency service staff who will be deployed during the G7 Summit and so a temporary mast will be put in place to enhance the network.

Temporary building works are due to start in early May and the 25.5 metre mast will be disassembled following the Summit.

During this time, access to the car park may be impacted but we are working closely with those involved to ensure that any disruption is kept to a minimum.


Counter terrorism

All potential threats and intelligence are being assessed as part of the security and policing operation. Highly-skilled specialist officers will be visible in the community in the run up to and during the Summit to deter, detect and disrupt hostile threats and wider criminality while reassuring and engaging with the public.

Counter Terrorism Policing is an alliance of UK police forces working closely with security and intelligence agencies to prevent, deter and investigate terrorist activity. It is accountable to the NPCC Counter Terrorism Coordination Committee (CTCC) and works tirelessly to protect the public and our national security.

Police are committed to tackling all forms of extremist ideology which has the potential to threaten public safety and security.

The public can help us keep the event safe by being vigilant for anyone or anything that looks out of place or suspicious and by reporting it to police, security, or staff at any of the venues. If you hear anything that could suggest a terrorist threat, do not ignore it, report it.

In an emergency or if you need urgent police assistance, you should always dial 999. You can report suspicious activity by contacting the police in confidence via the Anti-Terrorist Hotline 0800 789321.


Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Organisers will be putting strict Covid-secure measures in place, including daily testing, to ensure the health and wellbeing of all staff, attendees and the public.

All domestic Covid-19 guidelines will be in force throughout the meeting, including social distancing measures.

Like any other major event this year, G7 organisers have contingencies in place and will be closely monitoring the situation in the lead up to, and during the meeting.


Crime/hate crime

We expect protests to occur, but we have no intelligence to suggest a potential rise in crime at this time. Police constantly monitor potential rises in crime and respond accordingly. Working with others, we are ready to respond to emergencies to ensure the safety of the public and to prevent or detect any related criminality. We will take swift and positive action if offences are committed in order to secure and preserve evidence, and to bring offenders to justice.

Public safety and the protection of life and property is our top priority, and we remain a 24/7 service. Plans are in place to manage the potential for heightened demand and call handling provision is a key part of our preparations for this event.

We have no intelligence to suggest a potential rise in hate crime at this time but we are constantly monitoring community tensions, working with our diverse communities.

We know that national and global events have the potential to trigger short-term rises in hate crime but we remain committed to helping people feel safe and secure as they go about their lives.

There is no place in society for hatred and intolerance. Nobody should have to face violence and intimidation because of who they are, and it is important that we stand together in the face of hostility.

We want to reassure victims of hate crime that we’ll take your reports seriously and give you the support you need. Anyone who suffers a hate crime should report it to the police, either by calling 101 (999 in an emergency) or online through https://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/reporthc or True Vision at www.report-it.org.uk.


Local policing services

Policing the Summit is a logistical challenge and will require considerable resourcing from all areas of the Force. However, we are not alone and will be bringing in substantial public order support and specialist skills from UK police forces under mutual aid arrangements. This will not only provide capacity and resilience for us to police the event but will help us to meet our promise of maintaining our day-to-day standard of policing and services to our local communities. Public safety is our top priority and we remain a 24/7 service for local residents.

Organisers are determined to make this an event for all residents in Cornwall to experience and share, but most of all the public needs to feel safe and protected in the run up to and during such a high-profile event in their community.


Protests and disorder

We expect protests to occur and have plans in place to provide a proportionate and effective response. We will always seek to facilitate the right to peaceful protest, balancing the right to protest legally and safely without disruption to local communities (subject to COVID-19 restrictions). We work with protest organisers to achieve this. Police will only place restrictions on protests in the interests of national security, public safety or for the prevention of disorder or crime.

We are well trained to maintain public order and stand ready if any disorder breaks out. Officers will seek to close down disorder as quickly as possible and we will not hesitate to take necessary action against anyone who deliberately chooses to act outside the law. Adequate call handling and custody provision is a key part of our planning for this event.

Forces have significant experience in policing protests safely and peacefully, and the starting point for any policing plan is community engagement. Officers will work to prevent events which would break the law from taking place by engaging with the organisers, where this is possible.

Police will continue to use a 4 Es approach of escalation, where they will engage, explain and encourage people to follow the regulations. Where this is not effective, then enforcement action may be taken.

The public can help us to keep the protests safe by being vigilant for anyone or anything that looks out of place or suspicious and by reporting it to police, security, or staff at any of the venues.

The law states that protest organisers must inform the police in writing six days before a public march. Police have the power to limit or change the route of the march and set conditions. This is considered when there are concerns around serious public disorder, damage to property or serious disruption to community life.

More detailed information can be found on our Protest page.

We cannot reveal specifics due to security considerations. However, plans are in place to manage the potential for large-scale arrests and sufficient custody provision is a key part of our preparations for this event.

In order to facilitate peaceful and lawful protest at the G7 Summit, police and local councils have been working together to identify dedicated sites across the force area for the G7 Summit, where people can go to express their views.

Following discussions, four sites have been identified:

Plymouth – The Hoe

Exeter – Flowerpots Playing Fields

Falmouth – Church Street Car Park

Truro – Lemon Quay

Further specific details about each location will be released in due course.

Space is limited in the St Ives area and therefore we would encourage anyone who wishes to gather to express their views on the G7 event, to visit either the Falmouth or Truro sites.


Resources

A major operation is underway to plan the policing and security response to the G7 Summit. We have been preparing for this for months and speaking with other police forces who have led policing operations for events of similar scale and national importance. We are holding regular meetings involving key local partners to prepare for any eventuality, including the potential for protest and disorder.

While policing the G7 Summit is unique for us, the planning involved in the policing response is routine and we have tried and tested plans in place for major public events. These plans will be continually monitored and developed based upon any intelligence received.

Operationally we are well prepared; we feel ready and confident to meet the complex security challenges ahead.

Some 5,000 officers will be drafted in to enable us to police the event and maintain our existing local policing services. This support is given under mutual aid arrangements. Our aim is to ensure a safe and positive experience for visiting officers as well as our own.

Police forces are able to ask other forces for additional officers to support them in response to or in anticipation of a major incident or event. This is likely to be extraordinary to the normal policing arrangements in an area. Forces routinely share officers through mutual aid to ensure an appropriate police presence exists where there is increased demand for it. Mutual aid is nothing new for Devon & Cornwall Police.

The National Police Coordination Centre manages requests for mutual aid, and national policy governs rest days, pay, and arrangements for hosting volunteer officers. Mutual aid requests are made based on a strategic threat and risk assessment of incidents and the length of mobilisation will depend on the circumstances of the incident.

The cost of the event will be borne by Central Government. Any linked operational costs incurred by our Force will be recouped from the Government.


Security arrangements

The policing operation is largely focused on identifying and deterring potential security threats, and the deployment of the required police resources. The Force is working closely with Government, local and national partners and local communities to gather and coordinate intelligence and prepare for any threats. While we cannot reveal specifics about the security and policing arrangements at this time, all measures needed will be undertaken to keep people safe.

The Force will deploy its breadth of policing expertise and technology to secure the venues and routes and ensure the safety of everyone. The public can expect to see Force drones, the use of Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR), specialist search, firearms, public order and specialist operational officers.

The Force is working closely with the Government and partner agencies on in-depth plans and preparations to deliver a safe and secure event for everyone while maintaining existing local policing services.

We are well prepared for any policing issues that may arise. Our robust plans are tried and tested, and will be continually monitored and developed based on what is happening nationally with the Summit arrangements. We are considering and preparing for all worst-case scenarios to inform our planning.

Public safety is our top priority and we remain a 24/7 service. Any breach of security will be dealt with swiftly without compromise to the safety of the local community. The nature of policing is reactive, but our plans will stand us in good stead for any eventuality. Working with others we are ready to respond to emergencies to ensure the safety of the public.